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Showing posts by 'unasur'

Guest Post: Correa is No Chávez

Ecuador Venezuela Guest Post: Correa is No Chávez

This is a guest post by Stephanie Leutert, a research associate here at the Council on Foreign Relations who works with me in the Latin America program. Venezuelan President Hugo...

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The Limited Integration of Latin American Governance

Ecuador Honduras Latin America Venezuela The Limited Integration of Latin American Governance

The aspiration to integrate governance between Latin America’s twenty nations to address issues ranging from human rights to economic development to security concerns are long-held, but have led to mostly...

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Reads of the Week: Analyzing Humala’s Victory in Peru

Peru Reads of the Week: Analyzing Humala’s Victory in Peru

Steven Levitsky’s recent article in the Journal of Democracy explains why Humala won the Peruvian elections last summer. He points to a mix of campaign particulars — most importantly the divisions within the center-right – Humala’s effective shift from the left to the center, and most fundamentally, state weakness (which tends to push voters toward anti-establishment candidates). The Peruvian state has always been weak – as Hillel Soifer’s work has shown.

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Venezuela’s Presidential Race

Venezuela Venezuela’s Presidential Race

Today, chances are Hugo Chávez will face off against Henrique Capriles Radonski in the 2012 October presidential elections. The 39-year-old former mayor of Caracas’s Baruta Municipality (2000-2008) and current Miranda state Governor is leading the opposition candidates, and polling just 2 percentage points below Chávez. He is a lawyer who entered politics at the age of 26 to become the youngest member of the Chamber of Deputies until it was dissolved in 1999.

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Reads of the Week: The Latin American Soybean Boom, Mexican Security Spending and U.S. Drug Markets

Brazil Mexico Reads of the Week: The Latin American Soybean Boom, Mexican Security Spending and U.S. Drug Markets

A recent article by Mariano Turzi argues that soy is the most recent of Latin America's commodity booms, creating many of the same challenges that metals, minerals, and oil brought in the past. Whether economic booms and busts, populist leaders, or fights between more powerful (e.g. Brazil) and weaker (e.g. Paraguay, Uruguay, and Bolivia) nations in the supply chain, Turzi worries about the fallout for the Southern Cone and its future.

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Reads of the Week: Extortion vs. Drug-Trafficking in Mexico, New Reports on U.S. Drug Use and Competitiveness in Latin America

Argentina Brazil Chile El Salvador Guatemala Mexico United States Venezuela Reads of the Week: Extortion vs. Drug-Trafficking in Mexico, New Reports on U.S. Drug Use and Competitiveness in Latin America

A new piece by Eduardo Guerrero in Nexos looks at the growing problem of extortion in Mexico. Differentiating it from drug trafficking, he finds it more brutal and violence, and argues it is on the rise for three reasons: fragmentation of cartels, displacement of crime rings (and their response to expand into new territories), and finally rampant impunity for such acts.

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Reads of the Week: Public Opinion in Mexico and Guatemala, Argentine Elections, and the Fall of “La Barbie”

Argentina Guatemala Mexico Reads of the Week: Public Opinion in Mexico and Guatemala, Argentine Elections, and the Fall of “La Barbie”

The Pew Research Center released the results of a wide-ranging public opinion poll based on interviews with some 800 Mexicans (the study is part of their larger Global Attitudes Project). It finds strong continued support for military - 83 percent favor their role in the drug war - and for U.S.-Mexico security cooperation, with nearly 3 in 4 Mexicans supporting U.S. training and weapons for national security forces.

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Drug Cartel Fragmentation and Violence

Colombia Mexico Drug Cartel Fragmentation and Violence

One of the heralded lessons of Colombia’s fight against drug cartels is that fragmentation reduces violence.Mexico has, in fact, done this fairly successfully. Of the 37 thugs on its Most Wanted list, 21 are either behind bars or six feet underground. Where once U.S. and Mexican officials cited four main criminal organizations, today the number has at least doubled, complemented by the rise of many smaller operations and local gangs. But as the Mexican cartels multiplied, violence escalated to all time highs.

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CFR’s Independent Task Force: Global Brazil and U.S.-Brazil Relations

Brazil China Latin America CFR’s Independent Task Force: Global Brazil and U.S.-Brazil Relations

Today the Council on Foreign Relations is releasing its independent Task Force report, “Global Brazil and U.S.-Brazil Relations”. Although there were some differences of opinion among Task Force members (some of which are noted in the additional comments and dissents section of the report), everyone agreed to Brazil’s rising importance.

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Reads of the Week: Latin America’s Democracies, Mexican Migration, and More

Brazil Immigration Latin America Mexico Reads of the Week: Latin America’s Democracies, Mexican Migration, and More

Jorge Dominguez’s recent testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere gives an overview of Latin America’s progress toward democratic consolidation in recent history, and the role the international community has played in this slow, but steady, march.

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