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Showing posts by 'Ollanta Humala'

Reads of the Week: Analyzing Humala’s Victory in Peru

Peru Reads of the Week: Analyzing Humala’s Victory in Peru

Steven Levitsky’s recent article in the Journal of Democracy explains why Humala won the Peruvian elections last summer. He points to a mix of campaign particulars — most importantly the divisions within the center-right – Humala’s effective shift from the left to the center, and most fundamentally, state weakness (which tends to push voters toward anti-establishment candidates). The Peruvian state has always been weak – as Hillel Soifer’s work has shown.

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Peru’s Balancing Act: Indigenous Rights and Economic Development

Bolivia Ecuador Peru Peru’s Balancing Act: Indigenous Rights and Economic Development

Andean protesters shout slogans against the government in Lima (Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Courtesy Reuters). Andean protesters shout slogans against the government in Lima (Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Courtesy Reuters). Last month Peruvian President Ollanta Humala signed the popular consultation law, approved unanimously by Congress in August. This new law will require all public and private investors to consult local indigenous groups if and when their activities may affect their communities or ancestral lands. This is an important democratic step forward, reaching out to citizens who have for years been left out of the political process. In Latin America more broadly, incorporating indigenous communities into politics is a key challenge for consolidating democracy.

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Reads of the Week: Mixed Views on Mexico’s Economy and Peru’s Security

Mexico Peru Reads of the Week: Mixed Views on Mexico’s Economy and Peru’s Security

An IMF report published this week lauds the Mexican economy’s health, and credits robust fundamentals and good policy choices for its success in weathering the storm of global economic crisis. With even more positive news, a recent study by the Mexican government shows that FDI is still pouring in despite violence, and is actually going to the most dangerous areas. But this doesn’t mean that violence is not having an effect on the economy.

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Reads of the Week: a New Peruvian President, a New U.S. Security Directive, and Some Old Lessons from Colombia

Colombia Mexico Peru Reads of the Week: a New Peruvian President, a New U.S. Security Directive, and Some Old Lessons from Colombia

As President Ollanta Humala assumes office today, it looks as if he has chosen to emulate Lula rather than Chavez. His cabinet is full of moderates, and some even see it as leaning center-right. While growth is expected to continue at about 6 percent, the new administration will face many challenges, in particular security and the increasing presence of transnational crime, as well as high levels of inequality.

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Reads of the Week: New Migration Trends, and Valenzuela’s Tenure

Immigration Mexico Peru Reads of the Week: New Migration Trends, and Valenzuela’s Tenure

While two weeks ago Damien Cave’s great New York Times piece highlighted the positive economic factors keeping Mexicans at home, this week the Wall Street Journal adds border crossing dangers to the reasons for a downward trend in undocumented migration. This holds doubly true for Central Americans. A recent RAND study shows that while fewer Mexicans are coming to the United States, fewer are leaving as well, even with the economic downturn. Its authors suggest that this is due to the “target earner hypothesis,” which holds that migrants will not return to their home country until they have earned a prefixed level of savings. I’d add that the increasing costs and dangers of returning must also affect migrants’ calculation.

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Will Peru Take on the Narco-Traffickers?

Peru Will Peru Take on the Narco-Traffickers?

Though successful anti-poverty and anti-drug campaigns are not mutually exclusive, achieving both sets of aims will be no easy feat for Peru’s incoming president. As Wall Street waits to see how the recent elections will affect Peru’s economic trajectory, domestic and international communities should also be looking toward Humala’s initial security programs, and how he will balance the fight against drugs with his long-standing commitment to improving the lot of Peru’s poor.

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