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Showing posts by 'drug consumption'

Reads of the Week: The Latin American Soybean Boom, Mexican Security Spending and U.S. Drug Markets

Brazil Mexico Reads of the Week: The Latin American Soybean Boom, Mexican Security Spending and U.S. Drug Markets

A recent article by Mariano Turzi argues that soy is the most recent of Latin America's commodity booms, creating many of the same challenges that metals, minerals, and oil brought in the past. Whether economic booms and busts, populist leaders, or fights between more powerful (e.g. Brazil) and weaker (e.g. Paraguay, Uruguay, and Bolivia) nations in the supply chain, Turzi worries about the fallout for the Southern Cone and its future.

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Reads of the Week: Extortion vs. Drug-Trafficking in Mexico, New Reports on U.S. Drug Use and Competitiveness in Latin America

Argentina Brazil Chile El Salvador Guatemala Mexico United States Venezuela Reads of the Week: Extortion vs. Drug-Trafficking in Mexico, New Reports on U.S. Drug Use and Competitiveness in Latin America

A new piece by Eduardo Guerrero in Nexos looks at the growing problem of extortion in Mexico. Differentiating it from drug trafficking, he finds it more brutal and violence, and argues it is on the rise for three reasons: fragmentation of cartels, displacement of crime rings (and their response to expand into new territories), and finally rampant impunity for such acts.

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Demand Side Policies in the U.S. War on Drugs

Brazil Colombia Mexico United States Demand Side Policies in the U.S. War on Drugs

The “drug war” strategy of the last four decades revolves primarily around supply side measures. Whether eradication, interdiction, or arrests, it fixates on stopping the seemingly endless flow of drugs and cash across U.S. borders. But there is obviously another side to the equation – U.S. demand. The United States is the largest consumer of drugs across the globe (though there are signs that the cocaine and marijuana markets in Europe and the developing world are catching up) with 1 in every 7 Americans having tried an illegal substance.

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