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Central America's Moment

El Salvador General Guatemala Honduras Immigration Latin America United States Central America's Moment

While Brazil and Mexico (in good and bad ways) tend to fill U.S. headlines regarding Latin America, other nations matter as well for the United States. Among them are the...

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Estimating the Costs of Restrictive Immigration Laws

Immigration Latin America Mexico United States Estimating the Costs of Restrictive Immigration Laws

Much has been written about the rise of restrictive immigration laws in states such as Arizona, Alabama, and Georgia, both by those for and against these measures. What is now...

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Campaign 2012: Latin America

General Immigration Latin America

Below is a video interview I did for the Council on Foreign Relations’ Campaign 2012 series. In it I talk about the three big issues in U.S.-Latin America policy facing...

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Debating Amnesty and Immigration Policy

Immigration Mexico

Yesterday I had an exchange with my CFR colleague, Ed Husain (who has a fantastic blog, “The Arab Street,”), about my last post on Mitt Romney’s “self-deportation” plan. I wanted...

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What’s Wrong With Romney’s “Self-Deportation” Plan

Immigration Mexico What’s Wrong With Romney’s “Self-Deportation” Plan

During Monday’s Republican presidential debate, Mitt Romney put forth his plan for dealing with illegal immigration: self-deportation. Here is how the exchange went: Debate Moderator Adam Smith: Governor Romney there’s...

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What to Watch in 2012: The End of Latino Immigration?

Brazil Immigration Mexico What to Watch in 2012: The End of Latino Immigration?

Looking ahead to the new year ahead of us, these next two weeks I want to look at important developments affecting Latin America that are worth keeping a close eye...

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Can the GOP Win the Latino Vote – and Does It Matter?

Immigration Mexico Can the GOP Win the Latino Vote – and Does It Matter?

At last week’s Republican presidential debate a member of the audience provocatively reminded the candidates that not all of the Latinos in the United States are illegal, and then asked...

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Revitalizing the Border Governor’s Conference

Immigration Mexico United States Revitalizing the Border Governor’s Conference

This week the Mexican state of Baja California will host the two-day Border Governor’s Conference. Started nearly two decades ago, the annual meeting brings together governors from all four U.S. and six Mexican border states to discuss the issues directly affecting their states and citizens. At its height in the early 2000s, the governors and their ministers met not just with each other but also with representatives from Commerce, Homeland Security, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other departments and agencies to influence border-centered debates in both Washington, DC and Mexico City.

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Reads of the Week: New Migration Trends, and Valenzuela’s Tenure

Immigration Mexico Peru Reads of the Week: New Migration Trends, and Valenzuela’s Tenure

While two weeks ago Damien Cave’s great New York Times piece highlighted the positive economic factors keeping Mexicans at home, this week the Wall Street Journal adds border crossing dangers to the reasons for a downward trend in undocumented migration. This holds doubly true for Central Americans. A recent RAND study shows that while fewer Mexicans are coming to the United States, fewer are leaving as well, even with the economic downturn. Its authors suggest that this is due to the “target earner hypothesis,” which holds that migrants will not return to their home country until they have earned a prefixed level of savings. I’d add that the increasing costs and dangers of returning must also affect migrants’ calculation.

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Reads of the Week: Latin America’s Democracies, Mexican Migration, and More

Brazil Immigration Latin America Mexico Reads of the Week: Latin America’s Democracies, Mexican Migration, and More

Jorge Dominguez’s recent testimony before the Senate Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere gives an overview of Latin America’s progress toward democratic consolidation in recent history, and the role the international community has played in this slow, but steady, march.

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